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Ohio State vs Alabama: A Comparison of The States’ Medical Marijuana Programs

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If you’re a college football fan, then it is no surprise that Ohio State and Alabama are two of the most historic teams in the NCAA. In 1978, these two teams met in their first bowl game for the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans. They met again in the 2021 for the National Championship game and are once again battling for a spot in the upcoming Championship game in early January.  But today, we are covering a new comparison of the two states’ medical marijuana programs and what each has to offer.

Medical Marijuana Is Now Legal In Alabama

On May 17, 2021, Governor Kay Ivey signed Senate Bill 46 into law that allows the use of medical cannabis with a recommendation from a certified physician. This made Alabama the 37th state in the U.S. to legalize medical marijuana. While the program is not up and running just yet, we will take a look at what we do know so far and what you can expect during the process of obtaining your medical marijuana card.

Ohio vs Alabama Medical Marijuana Programs

While medical cannabis legalization is becoming more widespread across the United States, each state has its own guidelines and rules in place under its law. The following sections will highlight the comparisons between Ohio and Alabamas medical cannabis laws in regards to qualifying conditions, dispensaries, home cultivation and more.

Qualifying Conditions in Ohio and Alabama

In Ohio there are currently 25 qualifying conditions that make patients eligible for medical marijuana treatment. The conditions are as follows:

Alabama on the other hand has only 16 qualifying medical conditions which are as follows:

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • Cancer-related cachexia, nausea or vomiting, weight loss, or chronic pain
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Depression
  • Epilepsy or a condition causing seizures
  • HIV/AIDS-related nausea or weight loss
  • Panic disorder
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Persistent nausea that is not significantly responsive to traditional treatment, except for nausea related to pregnancy, cannabis-induced cyclical vomiting syndrome, or cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Sickle Cell Anemia
  • Spasticity associated with a motor neuron disease, including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Spasticity associated with Multiple Sclerosis or a spinal cord injury
  • Terminal illness
  • Tourette’s Syndrome
  • A condition causing chronic or intractable pain in which conventional therapeutic intervention and opiate therapy is contraindicated or has proved ineffective

Home Grow in Ohio and Alabama

Both Ohio and Alabama prohibit home cultivation of cannabis plants in patients’ homes. Cannabis products can only be purchased at a licensed dispensary.

Medical Marijuana Dispensaries in Ohio and Alabama

Currently, there are 52 dispensaries in Ohio that are open and operating. Back in April of 2021, the Ohio Board of Pharmacy announced that it would allow licensing for an additional 73 facilities which will bring the total number of potential dispensaries to 130.

Whereas in Alabama, it may be some time before residents begin to see dispensaries opening up in the state. Since Alabama’s medical marijuana law was recently passed, a timeline is still being established on when medical treatment will officially be available. Patrick Moody, deputy commissioner of the Alabama Department of Agriculture, stated that he anticipates licenses for medical cannabis growers to be granted before September 1 of 2022.

This means that products may not be available for sale until at least 2023 since it can take three to four months for cannabis plants to be ready for processing. The bill has not stated a limit on how many dispensaries can be established, but we assume facilities will be located in major cities across Alabama like Birmingham, Huntsville, Montgomery and Tuscaloosa.

Products Available At Dispensaries in Ohio and Alabama

Under Alabama’s new cannabis law, patients will be able to access and consume cannabis in the form of oral tablet, capsules, tinctures, suppositories, skin patches, inhalers, non-sugar coated gelatinous cubes, gels, oils, creams and other topical applications. However, qualifying patients are prohibited from smoking, vaping or infusing cannabis into food products.

In Ohio, the laws are more lenient as patients can purchase cannabis flower, edibles, vape, tinctures, topicals, waxes and concentrates from dispensaries. Similar to Alabama law, it is also prohibited to smoke cannabis flower although it is sold at facilities. Yet, patients are allowed to vaporize cannabis, along with waxes and oils.

Cannabis Possession Limits in Ohio and Alabama

Registered patients in Ohio are allowed to possess up to a 90-day supply of medical cannabis at once. This includes:

  • 8 ounces of Tier 1 cannabis flower
  • 5 and 3/10 ounces of Tier 2 cannabis flower
  • 55 grams of THC content in topical cannabis products
  • 9 and 9/10 grams of THC content in edibles, oils, capsules or tinctures
  • 53 and 1/10 grams of THC content in vaporizable cannabis products

In Alabama, registered patients are allowed to possess a maximum of 70 daily dosages of medical marijuana at one time.

Medical Marijuana Caregivers in Ohio and Alabama

Ohio’s and Alabama’s medical marijuana programs allow the use of caregivers. Patients are able to designate a caregiver who can visit, purchase, transport, and administer medical cannabis products on their behalf. This is especially beneficial for patients who are physically unable to go to a dispensary due to their medical condition(s). In both Ohio and Alabama, caregivers must be at least 21 years or older. If a patient is a minor, they will need a parent or legal guardian to serve as their caregiver.

How Can I Get An Alabama Medical Marijuana Card?

Before patients can access Alabama dispensaries once they open and purchase products, they must first visit a certified physician who can recommend medical marijuana treatment so they can obtain their card. In order to qualify for a medical marijuana card, Alabama residents must meet certain requirements outlined by the state law. The requirements are as follows:

  • Individuals must be at least 19 years of age or older
  • Be an Alabama resident (with proof of a valid ID, state ID, or Alabama Driver’s License)
  • Is certified by a registered certifying physician that as having a qualifying medical condition

Once you schedule an appointment to meet with a certified physician, medical records documenting the diagnosis of your qualifying condition(s) may also be required during the time of your appointment.

After you’ve been approved by a physician, you will register with the state of Alabama by submitting your written recommendation and paying an application fee of up to $65. Once the state approves your application, you will be notified and sent an official copy of your identification card so you can begin accessing dispensaries once they open.

Schedule An Appointment To Get Your Medical Marijuana Card Today!

At My Marijuana Cards, we are here to make the process of getting your medical marijuana card fast and easy! Our dedicated team of dedicated patient coordinators and understanding physicians are here to help guide you through every step of the process.

We have telemedicine appointments available so you can meet with one of our certified doctors right from the comfort and safety of your home. Give us a call at (877) 783-1805 to learn more, or schedule your appointment online today!

Cannabis Consultations Now Available

Not sure if medical cannabis treatment may be right for you? Personalized consultations are now also available to help you find the best cannabis options for you to reach your healthcare goals. Meet with a cannabis coach to privately discuss cannabis therapy and receive a personalized treatment plan based on your needs. Schedule your cannabis consultation online today!